Allosaurus fragilis

 

FACTS

Allosaurus is the most common predatory dinosaur from the Morrison Formation

Allosaurus is Greek for “different lizard”

Allosaurus is the state fossil of Utah!

Adult Allosaurus grew up to lengths of 30 feet

The dinosaur Allosaurus fragilis carries an infant Stegosaurus in its jaws

Allosaurus fragilis devours a juvenile Stegosaurus ungulates, a possible predator-prey interaction in the Morrison Ecosystem.


Allosaurus fragilis is the most common species of carnivorous theropod dinosaur in the Morrison Formation from the Late Jurassic of North America. Although only its bones are exposed in the present day quarry at Dinosaur, one of the best skeletons ever found came from the Carnegie Quarry and its skull is on exhibit in the Quarry Exhibit Hall.

Allosaurus fragilis is the most common species of carnivorous theropod dinosaur in the Morrison Formation from the Late Jurassic of North America. Although only its bones are exposed in the present day quarry at Dinosaur, one of the best skeletons ever found came from the Carnegie Quarry and its skull is on exhibit in the Quarry Exhibit Hall.

Allosaurus fragilis is one of three theropods found in the Carnegie Quarry, the others being Ceratosaurus sp. and Torvosaurus tanneri. Although thousands of Allosaurus bones have been excavated at the Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry in Emery County, Utah (Madsen 1976), those are separated and scattered bones, in contrast to the magnificent skeleton and skull found at Dinosaur.

Specimens of Allosaurus fragilis from the Carnegie Quarry:

Dino-2560

The best preserved and most complete skull of Allosaurus fragilis is on display at the Quarry Visitor Center.

P28A0055

This mounted cast of Allosaurus fragilis is based on the specimen from the Carnegie Quarry, and is on display at the Quarry Visitor Center.

Madsen, J.H. 1976. Allosaurus fragilis: a revised osteology. Utah Geological and Mineral Survey Bulletin 109: 163pp. Link to publication

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